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Dan Brown’s THE LOST SYMBOL out in September!
by Jonny on Apr 22, 2009 at 2:34 pm
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Yes, we know exactly how you feel. It’s been TOO long since our last adventure with Robert Langdon… Well, wait no longer! Dan Brown’s new novel, the eagerly awaited follow-up to The Da Vinci Code, is being published in the UK by Transworld Publishers on September 15th 2009! Stop pinching yourself, there’s no leg-pulling going on here…

So what can we expect from this new instalment? What’s certain is that The Lost Symbol is going to be another brilliantly compelling thriller, showcasing once again Dan Brown’s prodigious talent for storytelling, infused with history, codes and intrigue. The plot will also take place within a 12-hour period, so expect a face-paced thriller like no other.

“This novel has been a strange and wonderful journey,” said Dan Brown. “Weaving five years of research into the story’s 12-hour timeframe was an exhilarating challenge. Robert Langdon’s life clearly moves a lot faster than mine.”

The eerie title The Lost Symbol leaves a lot to the imagination, and speculation about the plot is already rife amongst bloggers and Twitterers, who are keen to guess what Dan Brown’s latest novel will be about. What is certain is that it will once again feature Dan Brown’s unforgettable protagonist, Robert Langdon, a Harvard symbologist with a knack for deciphering religious icons and unravelling international conspiracies.

The What Shall I Read?
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A Whole City of Book Thieves!
by Lynsey on Apr 21, 2009 at 2:14 pm
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Markus Zusak (c) Bronwyn Rennix

One City. One Book. A Thousand Conclusions!

Imagine sharing a book with your neighbour, with your hairdresser, with your bus driver and with your friends. Having one book for one city brings readers together. This year’s Brighton City Read is the engaging novel from Markus Zusak The Book Thief.

The Background The Book Thief by Markus Zusak

Last year Brighton & Hove celebrated Val McDermid’s A Place of Execution with three packed months of events, debates, discussions and, of course, reading.

The Read

For 2009 Brighton & Hove City Reads invites you to join in the city-wide read of Markus Zusak’s international bestseller The Book Thief. From the launch on 12th March to the final event at Brighton Dome on 23rd May, there’s a huge range of special events, workshops, reading groups and film showings devoted to The Book Thief and surrounding themes. Including an exclusive City Reads visit to Brighton Festival by Australian author Markus Zusak. To join in, simply pick up a copy and start reading.

To purchase a copy of The Book Thief please visit www.rbooks.co.uk

For more information on Brighton & Hove City Reads please visit www.cityreads.co.uk or www.brightonfestival.org

The What Shall I Read?
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The Solitude of Prime Numbers by Paolo Giordano
by Jonny on Apr 20, 2009 at 12:37 pm
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We at between-the-lines are very exciting about the forthcoming publication of The Solitude of Prime Numbers. Penned by debut novelist Paolo Giordano, the book is a true coming-of-age story in which the intertwined destinies of two friends are brought together by childhood tragedy. The Solitude of Prime Numbers is one of the finest debuts we have read this year, with an ease and elegance that is truly rare in a first novel.

The Solitude of Prime Numbers

Since publication in Italy the book has sold over a whopping 1 million copies, sold in 34 countries, and won five literary awards, including the Premio Campiello Opera Prima and most notably Italy’s premier literary award, the Premio Strega (the Italian equivalent of the Man Booker Prize). At 26 years old, Giordano is the youngest author to have received this literary recognition, placing him alongside previous winners Primo Levi, Umberto Eco and Niccolò Ammaniti.

Read the rest of this entry »

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Jane Davis on Winning the Daily Mail First Novel Award.
by Lynsey on Apr 16, 2009 at 12:02 pm
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Daily Mail Winner Jane Davis

 Daily Mail First Novel Award winner Jane Davis talks to Between the Lines about her reaction to winning the award.

My Reaction to Winning the Daily Mail First Novel Award

Even with hard graft, luck always plays a significant role in life. In June 2008, I attended the Winchester Writers’ Conference on the recommendation of my agent, Teresa Chris. It was a stroke of luck that I chose a lecture hosted by Transworld and Jack Sheffield, author of Teacher, Teacher! It was there that I learned about the Daily Mail First Novel Award, only two days before the closing date for entries. On the closing date itself, I wrapped a copy of my manuscript in brown paper and carried it to the post office, praying that the deadline would be flexible. My real incentive for entering was not the thought of winning; it was the promise that all entries would be read. In common with most unpublished writers, I have struggled to find professionals who were prepared to read my writing.

Earlier that month, frustrated, I had handed my notice in at work. It was a job I had been doing since the age of eighteen. I was one of the lucky ones. I had joined a small company that I could grow with and a boss who looked beyond formal qualifications and focused on ability. The previous November, I had been promoted to the position of deputy managing director. But the truth is that we don’t always wish for the things that make us happy.

In the past, I have always dreaded meeting new people. It is only a matter of time before someone looks at you meaningfully and asks, “And what do you do?” I have never thought that my job as an insurance broker said much about who I am. My brother-in-law (a naval architect no less) worked out how to deal with this nonsense a long time ago. He describes himself as a biscuit designer and, if pressed, he tells his assailant that he designed the Hovis digestive. And then he modestly accepts all of the praise that follows.

My plan on leaving my job was to give myself a two-year sabbatical, with the challenge of trying to get my work published.

I had started to write at the age of 35. Although I was in need of a creative outlet, I also wanted to work through my feelings about something that had happened in my life that I was having difficulty making sense of. At the age of 17, a friend was killed when he tried to stop a group of gatecrashers at a party. In the summer of 2000, I went to the christening of a friend’s baby at the same Catholic Church that I had attended as a child. Sitting in the pew in from of me was the man who had served time for the manslaughter of my friend, with his wife and four children. Laughing. Respectable. Alive.

In the short space of time, I went from not knowing if I had anything to write about to not being able to stop writing.

Half Truths and White Lies by Jane Davis

The timing of Transworld’s announcement was absolutely perfect. I had already been notified that my novel had been short-listed in the final six, but I hadn’t wanted to build my hopes up too much. A month after leaving my job, the honeymoon period was well and truly over. I am not one of life’s natural risk-takers. I like security and monthly pay packets and I have a healthy fear of poverty. Every time that I turned on the television there was talk of financial doom and gloom. Full of self-doubt, I began to worry that I had made a foolish mistake.

I received the call from Transworld when I was at home on my own and, because I was alone, I wasn’t quite sure how to react. There was no one to ask, ‘Did that just happen?’ I have always been a bit of a daydreamer. Half an hour later, when I had tried and failed to contact my partner, my mother and various friends by phone, I began to think that I might have imagined it.

Winning the competition is about more than seeing my book in print: it is about validation, about taking risks and about throwing caution to the wind. My hope is that I can be an inspiration to other people to get writing. I don’t have a degree and have never attended a creative writing class. I just had a bit of spare time on my hands, a second-hand laptop, and enough will power to stick at it.

Just in case I should ever get too big for my boots, I have my family to keep me in my rightful place: the middle child of a family of many talented individuals. My sister Anne took great delight in telling me how she announced my win to a group of friends who were distracted by wine glasses and babies:

“Listen up. I have a small announcement to make. My sister has won the Daily Mail new novelist of the year award.”
To which one (male) friend replied in shock, “Your sister won the nude modelist of the year award?”

I have had nothing but support from Transworld and to them I say this: Thank you from the bottom of my heart. The finished book truly is a team effort, of which I am only part.

It may be some time before I have the confidence to call myself a writer, but I am delighted that Joanne Harris has read my work and is kind enough to describe me as one. I feel very proud. But at the same time, I feel very humble.

The What Shall I Read?
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The British Book Awards: by David Ebershoff
by Jonny on Apr 7, 2009 at 5:21 pm
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We were delighted when two of our authors, Kate Atkinson and David Ebershoff were both noinated for the coveted ‘Best Book’ award at this years book awards. Then of course we were overjoyed when Kate Atkinson won the said title with her latest Jackson Brodie thriller ‘When Will There be Good News?’.

Well, have you ever wondered what it must feel like to be be a part of the glitz and glamour of an event such as this? To have your work displayed so publicly, a piece of your soul confined to paper and then for many of the industries finest to actually say ‘this is really rather good’ and put it up for an award?

Well, David Ebershoff, author of The 19th Wife, despite just missing out on the prize has willingly given us an insight into the event itself and what it feels like to be swept up by the Richard and Judy phenomenon.

david-ebershoff-the-nibbies.JPG“I was warned. A number of people told me the ceremony for the British Book Awards, or the Nibbies, was an unlikely meeting of the worlds of book publishing and showbiz. But at some point during Friday night’s ceremony in a subterranean ballroom at the Grosvenor House Hotel – maybe it was when Jerry Hall appeared on the stage to present an award while slyly dropping that her memoirs would be in stores on September 3; or perhaps it was when Jerry Springer gave out the award for New Writer of the Year to Tom Rob Smith – I decided I was loving it. All of it. The red carpet. The Oscar-inspired interlude music. The introductions scrolling down the teleprompt. The envelope opening. The awards – giant brass pen-nibs – handed out by women in ball gowns. Through the thousand-plus people I spotted writers who I knew only through their books – Joseph O’Neill, Niall Ferguson, Aravind Adiga, and Mr. Smith, who looked snazzy in a shiny white leather dinner jacket. On stage the evening’s hosts, Richard & Judy, sailed through their banter like the television pros they are. I stared up at them lovingly, even when their jokes fell flat, because I’ve come to think of them as my fairy godparents. They plucked me, or, rather, my novel, The 19th Wife, from obscurity and flung it into the palms of thousands and thousands of readers via their book club. And that’s why I was there. Although I lost my category, Richard & Judy’s Best Read of the Year, to the deserving Kate Atkinson, I sat through the whole evening with a warm, gentle feeling of awe. All of this for books? All of these people, this attention, these television cameras, for novels and biographies and histories? (True, a few celebrity bios were being touted as well, but so what?) These days, many good books – most in fact – receive a great big cold shoulder from the world. All of us who care about good writing should rejoice whenever the larger world takes note. And so my evening at the Nibbies was something of a literary dream. For a few hours we all dressed up and pretended writers and editors and publishers and booksellers were at the center of the cultural conversation. And then it was time to go home. I never got to meet Richard and Judy. If I had, I would’ve said Thank you, not only for what they have done for me personally but for what they have done for books and reading. In the end, that’s why were all there — to be a part of that magical, ineffable moment when a reader opens a new book and falls into the world of words.”

David Ebershoff

The What Shall I Read?
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Science Fiction Gems on Ebay
by Lynsey on Apr 7, 2009 at 9:38 am
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Check out the Sci-Fi and fantasy items being auctioned for Beatbullying’s Cybermentors campaign on ebay. Listings include a signed first edition American copy of Wintersmith donated by Sir Terry Pratchett.

SciFi Ebay Listings

Feegle

The What Shall I Read?
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The fantastic When Will There Be Good News? by Transworld literary star Kate Atkinson was named Richard & Judy’s Best Read of the Year at the 2009 Galaxy British Book Awards, held on Friday 3rd April at the Grosvenor House Hotel.

We at between-the-lines have been great supporters of the book and are thrilled that it won the most prestigious of the Nibbie awards.  The book was also shortlisted for Crime Thriller of the Year, and is the bestselling adult title so far in 2009.  Widely critically acclaimed on publication, Atkinson’s novel reprises her popular character Jackson Brodie who also featured in Case Histories and One Good Turn.

The author thanked several members of the Transworld team in her acceptance speech, including Larry Finlay, Bill Scott-Kerr, Marianne Velmans and Alison Barrow.

When Will There Be Good News

The What Shall I Read?
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Are you a Warrior, a Healer… or a Thief?
by Lynsey on Apr 6, 2009 at 12:31 pm
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 Natasha Mostert

Find out by playing Natasha Mostert’s fantastic online game to coincide with the publication of THE KEEPER.

The Keeper is published on the 9th April by Bantam Books and is a gripping psychological thriller that blends ancient mysteries with a modern-day hunt for a terrifying killer.

If you fancy winning a Sony Reader, a pair of pink or black boxing gloves and other fantastic prizes while finding something out about yourselves you didn’t know – click on the link below, and start playing!

 www.thekeepergame.com

The Keeper by Natasha Mostert

The What Shall I Read?
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David Ebershoff pops into Waterstones
by Jonny on Apr 3, 2009 at 10:56 am
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David Ebershoff is in London town for the British Book Awards this evening. Along with Kate Atkinson’s When Will There be Good News?, his novel, The 19th Wife, is up for the coveted prize of ‘Richard & Judy’s Best Read’ and here at Transworld towers we are on the edges of our seats for this evenings revelations. I’m sure you will all join me in a mutual finger crossing for both authors.

Finding himself with a spare couple of hours in the city yesterday David popped into Waterstones and was delighted to see his book so proudly displayed.

 

david-ebershoff-in-waterstones.JPG

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We at Transworld pride ourselves on the strength of our crime / thriller list.  We are the home of Tess Gerritsen, Mo Hayder, SJ Bolton, Simon Beckett, Lee Child, Dan Brown, Robert Goddard, Simon Kernick and many many more!  We are therefore not surprised that a clutch of Transworld’s brightest crime writing stars have been nominated for several prestigious awards.  Here are the nominees and hopefully soon to be winners!

Christopher Fowler’s The Victoria Vanishes has been shortlisted for the Last Laugh Award for Best Humorous Crime Novel of 2008, winner to be announced at the CrimeFest convention in Bristol on 16 May.

Charlie Newton’s Calumet City has been shortlisted for the International Thriller Writers’ Best First Novel Award, winner to be announced at ThrillerFest in New York on July 11

As has S.J. Bolton’s Sacrifice, which has also been shortlisted for the ITW’s Best First Novel Award.
As has Ken Bruen who has been shortlisted for Best Short Story at ITW’s ThrillerFest for his story, Time of the Green.

We should of course also remember that Calumet City has been nominated for an Edgar Award for Best First Novel by an American writer, and that Sacrifice has also been shortlisted for the Mary Higgins Clark Award, both to be announced at the Edgar Award Dinner in New York on April 30th.

All of which goes to show what a strong list of prize winning crime authors we have at Transworld!

The Victoria VanishesSacrifice

Calumet City

The What Shall I Read?